Tag Archives: quilts

Scrap Quilts

My first quilt class was with Ann Albertson. I saw her work in the San Diego magazine and thought it was beautiful.  She rarely taught. Ten years after I started making quilts as baby gifts at Christmas I signed up for a class at the local quilt shop with Ann. It was a scrap quilt class. I walked in with an armload of fabrics. She took one look at me and said, “this is a scrap quilt class.” I set my fabric down on the table and said — “these will be scraps soon.”

The first class was explaining what a quilt was and what a scrap quilt was. She also gave many ideas for a scrappy quilt: Friendship Stars, Nine Patches, Puss in the Corner. I wanted to make a quilt with the pattern I had seen in the magazine. Challenging for someone who had never used templates.

The next class would be in two weeks. So I had time to make blocks. I fell in love with the picture of the quilt in the magazine. It was a Star within a Star block. I could only manage to make one quilt block a day. I had a toddler at home. I was very used to making freeform quilts and using templates was beyond me. Getting those points pointy was a struggle. I decided not to rush it because for the most part it was all new to me.

I decided to go back to the beginning and remember what beginning quilting was like. One major problem was lack of cotton fabrics for the longest time. Diana Leone wrote a Sampler Quilt book and I used polyester fabrics. Polyester fabrics were not stable and would shift when you sewed them.

The quilt above quilt is one I took it to a conference I took with Nancy Crow. It was machine pieced. And I machine and hand-quilted it.

To be continued

 

Quilts: My First

I started buying the Quilter’s Newsletter Magazine when it came out printed on a mimeograph machine. I collected them even though I was not a quilter. I was a seamstress, I made clothing, including wedding apparel. When we moved from the East Coast to San Jose a group of the ladies in the neighborhood, all from New York, formed a Tuesday night group. We brought whatever handy work we were doing at the time. I did Needlepoint, my own designs inspired by a picture I might see in a magazine.  Sometimes it was from a kit, but kits were expensive. I designed an occasional canvas that my friend Sharon Maher would buy from me.

One of the ladies in the group who kept the shell of an old VW bug in her backyard decided that she alone would bring a renaissance of quilting. I admired that. I thought someday I might be a quilter. With two toddlers I was sure it wouldn’t be anytime soon. I couldn’t even afford to buy a quilt at a flea market. If one was on the side of the road, I might stop for it, but that would be the only way I would own one.

I did love fabric and occasionally for an outing as a family we would ride the train into San Mateo. There was a mall there and in one of the stores they had a bin with scraps of fabrics leftover from silk ties. I learned to make men’s ties. My mother made the boys cute little short sets out of seersucker to wear so any sewing I did was usually for myself.

When we moved from San Jose to San Diego it was small and quiet. There wasn’t much to do and I didn’t know anyone. It was a young neighborhood with a lot of young children. Cheryl Herr lived down the street and in her living room sat a quilting frame. She could make a whole cloth quilt in a week completely hand quilted. She’d shop at K-Mart and buy two twin-sized sheets and a roll of polyester batting. All the furniture would be pushed to the side until she finished the quilt. I was inspired. I was not interested in a quilt made from sheets although her quilts were beautiful. She told me I could do it. Funny thing, I believed her. You have to believe you can do something or it will never happen.

The only place to buy fabric was at Sears. We had two and neither one was close, both were approximately the same distance in opposite directions. One day I was out with my next door neighbor and shopping buddy Barbara Johnson. She acted as my welcome wagon. She would drive me around and show me how to get places. One day we ended up in Escondido at Sears approximately 20 miles north of us. There was a needlework shop to buy threads for my needlepoint and Sears. I had scrap fabrics and an idea. My first quilt almost became my last quilt.  When you say, how hard could this be, you then find out. Putting the top together was not as difficult as sitting and hand quilting the top. It was summer and it was hot. I had a large embroidery hoop on a frame. I would quilt during the day in the sunlight while the boys napped. My quilting time could be very limited.

I limited my pallet which simplified the design process.

I still like this quilt, which belongs to my oldest son.

Quilt my first 002

Quilting: WIP

I dug into my WIPs = works in progress to find this which I loved when I made it but came to a stall.

25 Hour House 001

So after still more procrastination and why? I don’t know. I came to this

quilt 25 hour house 002 - Copy (359x640)

It is not what I intended to do when I originally made the houses — funny how it never is. It still isn’t finished, but it will be soon. Here’s hoping you all make progress on your WIPs = Works In Progress whatever they may be,

Joanne

Cedar Fire 2003 Quilts

turquoise and purple quiltpink+teal qlt 3x3Rty-red+yellow 3x3
The Cedar Fire was a wildfire which burned through a large area of San Diego County, in Southern California in October 2003. One house consumed in fire, burned to the ground in Ramona, was shown on the television over and over. The family lost everything. As it turned out the house was owned by a family that my son and daughter-in-law knew. I met them at my grandson’s birthday party. I made these three quilts for the children at the suggestion of my daughter-in-law. I was so happy to help even a little.

Riley the Critic

Riley the Critic

If a cat won’t lay on your quilt it isn’t worth much.

Riley came to us in the middle of the night through a mutual friend. He was rescued from a house that had 5 dogs and 7 cats. I knew him as a sweet, playful kitten as he had belonged to my son’s roommate but was abandoned at the last known address. Riley was underweight, full of fleas and had very bad house manners. He sat under furniture for several months and just watched us.